The Collation

Research and Exploration at the Folger

Folger Tooltips: Introducing “Folger Collection, by Folger Readers”

The purpose of this post is to introduce a new venue for you, Dear Readers, to post, share, and comment on photos taken by in the course of your research here: a new Flickr group, “Folger Collection, by Folger Readers”. But first, some background … Our Current Reading Room Camera Use Policy As anyone who has worked in our New or Old Reading Rooms in the last 18 months or so knows, we now have a Reading Room Camera Use Policy, which states (in part, but be sure to read the whole thing!):… Continue Reading

Folger Tooltips: Hamnet URLs, part one

The modest purpose of today’s tooltip is to introduce one major piece of scaffolding available to you in staging your online research at the Folger: the humble URL. Today we’ll talk about Hamnet bibliographic records and Basic Searches; future URL tooltips will cover more advanced Hamnet hotlink wrangling, as well as how to make URLs more useful to you in some of our other online resources.… Continue Reading

Folger Tooltips: Announcing Impos[i]tor

With today’s Tooltip, the Folger Shakespeare Library is proud to offer Impositor, an online tool to automatically arrange digital images from the collection into simulated impositions (the laying out of pages into the formes of printed sheets). Folio, quarto, octavo, duodecimo, and sextodecimo formats are available. Try it out and let us know what you think! But first, a bit of background.… Continue Reading

Folger Tooltips: Cover-to-Cover

Greetings, dear Readers This episode of Folger Tooltips covers a variety of methods for accessing cover-to-cover page images of early printed books and bound manuscripts from the Folger collection. At the moment there are three basic ways in: via Insight’s tried-and-true “Multi-page documents” (accessible once you have installed our free java client); via Luna’s web-based “BookReader views” (compound digital objects represented by a single thumbnail in search results); and, via what we’re calling “BookReader thumbnails” (sets of Luna search results represented by screens of thumbnails in page-by-page sort order).… Continue Reading

Folger Tooltips: Introduction

Greetings Dear Readers! Welcome to the first in a series of “tooltips” about how to access and best utilize online resources for conducting research at (or away from) the Folger Shakespeare Library. New bibliographic records and finding aids, and new tools for researchers, are continually in the works.  Some of our collection descriptions and digital toolsets are created in-house, such as the bibliographic records describing 82 First Folios (and fragments).… Continue Reading

Exploring Bess of Hardwick’s letters

As mentioned in a previous post, several online finding aids for manuscript collections at the Folger now include links to digital images of the documents, providing another avenue of access to both onsite and offsite researchers. Finding aids provide detailed descriptions about the creation, historical context, arrangement, and content of collections, helping researchers find items in a collection that are relevant to their interests.… Continue Reading

Bridging past and present

As I hope Collation readers know by now, the Folger is committed to openly accessible resources. Last week provided one example of the exciting results from such a scholarly pooling of knowledge. The story begins with a conference held at the Library on bindings, the culmination of a two-year project creating an online database of images of bindings at the Folger.… Continue Reading

Librarians gone wild: an alternative spring break

A guest post by Sarah Wingo [Editor’s note: This is the second in an ongoing series of posts written by interns at the Folger. For the introduction to the series, see the first post.] I am a student working towards my Masters of Science in Information from the University of Michigan’s School of Information (UM-SI).  I recently had the opportunity, along with six of my peers, to volunteer my time at the Folger Shakespeare Library during the week of our spring break.… Continue Reading

The most interesting use of our data will not be what we think it is

In Bloom It’s safe to say, the bloom is off the rose. Online collections just aren’t as sexy as they once were. Increasingly ubiquitious plans to put digital images online excite an increasingly smaller crowd. And projects that rely on new “Turning the Page” applications are likely to draw more ire than praise from a growing cohort (while beautiful, they pose problems for scholarly work and digital preservation).… Continue Reading