March 26, 2015
by The Collation
Comments Off on Q & A: Caroline Duroselle-Melish, Curator of Early Modern Books and Prints

Q & A: Caroline Duroselle-Melish, Curator of Early Modern Books and Prints

In January, Caroline Duroselle-Melish joined the Folger as the new Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Early Modern Books and Prints, a position that gives her responsibility over books and prints through 1800. She has worked with a wide range of collections … Continue reading

February 18, 2015
by Abbie Weinberg
Comments Off on Research round-up: February 2015

Research round-up: February 2015

The theme of this month’s post, which features two questions regarding 19th-century sources, is “We have materials beyond the early modern period!” As our collection development policy states, in addition to seeking primary source material on English and continental civilization … Continue reading

January 27, 2015
by Erin Blake
Comments Off on Acquisitions Night: February 5, 2015

Acquisitions Night: February 5, 2015

Got your tickets yet? Acquisitions Night is just over a week away! This once-a-year event directly supports the growth of the collection by giving people the chance to “adopt” selected items acquired over the past year—that is, reimburse the purchase price to the library so … Continue reading

December 30, 2014
by Erin Blake
Comments Off on Out with the old? The A.L.A. Portrait Index of 1906

Out with the old? The A.L.A. Portrait Index of 1906

To create more work space, we’re starting to sort through the hundreds of “ready reference” books that fill the shelves in the shared staff areas on Deck A, pulling out volumes that really don’t need to be kept that handy. For example,  it’s … Continue reading

August 12, 2014
by Erin Blake
10 Comments

Free cultural works! Come get your free cultural works!

It’s official: pictures in the Folger’s Digital Image Collection are now licensed CC BY-SA! That is, they can be used under a Creative Commons Attribution–ShareAlike 4.0 International License, one of the two Creative Commons licenses “approved for free cultural works.” That’s almost … Continue reading