December 22, 2011
by Sarah Werner
Comments Off on Reduce, reuse, recycle

Reduce, reuse, recycle

Did you think that “reduce, reuse, recycle” was just a modern slogan? Check out this early modern book:

December 19, 2011
by Guest Author

“What’s that letter?”: Searching for water amongst the leaves

A guest post by Folger Institute participant and short-term fellow Lehua Yim Sixteenth-century England was particularly formative in the long history of what “Britain” means for the peoples of that archipelago, as reformulations of political, legal, economic, and religious institutions … Continue reading

December 15, 2011
by Heather Wolfe
Comments Off on Manuscript reunions

Manuscript reunions

Sometimes we come across a manuscript on the market that looks vaguely familiar, and sends us scrambling to Hamnet to figure out why. I was reminded of this last week when a bookseller offered us a “naval return for Queen … Continue reading

December 12, 2011
by Sarah Werner
Comments Off on ‘Tis the season

‘Tis the season

For teachers, this is the season of grading; for students, this is the season of exam-taking and paper-writing. For some of you, both students and teachers, you get slammed on both sides (no matter how much you enjoy writing or … Continue reading

December 8, 2011
by Georgianna Ziegler and Caryn Lazzuri
Comments Off on Something borrowed . . .

Something borrowed . . .

Georgianna: Did you ever wonder why or how we borrow items to show in our exhibitions at the Folger? Let’s use the upcoming “Shakespeare’s Sisters: Women Writers, 1500-1700,” opening on February 2, 2012, as an example. My colleague Caryn Lazzuri … Continue reading

December 5, 2011
by Michael Poston
Comments Off on The most interesting use of our data will not be what we think it is

The most interesting use of our data will not be what we think it is

In Bloom It’s safe to say, the bloom is off the rose. Online collections just aren’t as sexy as they once were. Increasingly ubiquitious plans to put digital images online excite an increasingly smaller crowd. And projects that rely on … Continue reading