The Collation

Research and Exploration at the Folger

Yearly Archives: 2011

Reduce, reuse, recycle

Did you think that “reduce, reuse, recycle” was just a modern slogan? Check out this early modern book: printed waste used in the binding… Continue Reading

“What’s that letter?”: Searching for water amongst the leaves

A guest post by Folger Institute participant and short-term fellow Lehua Yim Sixteenth-century England was particularly formative in the long history of what “Britain” means for the peoples of that archipelago, as reformulations of political, legal, economic, and religious institutions added complexity to the webs of relationships that structured that society. Of particular interest to me are the shifts and innovations regarding rights to waters and lands in the history of real property.… Continue Reading

Manuscript reunions

Sometimes we come across a manuscript on the market that looks vaguely familiar, and sends us scrambling to Hamnet to figure out why. I was reminded of this last week when a bookseller offered us a “naval return for Queen Elizabeth I signed by Fulke Greville” (in his capacity as Treasurer of the Navy), consisting of the naval charges at Deptford for September 1600.… Continue Reading

‘Tis the season

For teachers, this is the season of grading; for students, this is the season of exam-taking and paper-writing. For some of you, both students and teachers, you get slammed on both sides (no matter how much you enjoy writing or grading, it’s hard to do a ton of it at once). So for your amusement today, some pictures along the theme of schooling, with an emphasis on looking rather than reading!… Continue Reading

Something borrowed . . .

Georgianna: Did you ever wonder why or how we borrow items to show in our exhibitions at the Folger? Let’s use the upcoming “Shakespeare’s Sisters: Women Writers, 1500-1700,” opening on February 2, 2012, as an example. My colleague Caryn Lazzuri and I have been working on this exhibition for almost two years. As the curator of this exhibit, I’ll begin by talking about why we borrow, and Caryn will follow up on the “how” in her role as Exhibitions Manager.… Continue Reading

The most interesting use of our data will not be what we think it is

In Bloom an uncut newsbook showing a quarto imposition It’s safe to say, the bloom is off the rose. Online collections just aren’t as sexy as they once were. Increasingly ubiquitious plans to put digital images online excite an increasingly smaller crowd. And projects that rely on new “Turning the Page” applications are likely to draw more ire than praise from a growing cohort (while beautiful, they pose problems for scholarly work and digital preservation).… Continue Reading

Folger Tooltips: Hamnet URLs, part one

The modest purpose of today’s tooltip is to introduce one major piece of scaffolding available to you in staging your online research at the Folger: the humble URL. Today we’ll talk about Hamnet bibliographic records and Basic Searches; future URL tooltips will cover more advanced Hamnet hotlink wrangling, as well as how to make URLs more useful to you in some of our other online resources.… Continue Reading

A Trip to the Fair

Every November, the International Fine Print Dealers’ Association (IFPDA) holds a fair at the Park Avenue Armory in Manhattan. Colloquially known as the New York Print Fair, almost 100 dealers from the US, Canada, and Europe bring a selection from their stock for visitors to inspect, admire, and possibly purchase. There’s no obligation to buy anything more than an admission ticket, so it’s a great opportunity for people to see museum-quality art without velvet ropes or protective glass, and to take pictures of anything they want (using a flash is an etiquette violation because it disturbs others, and I didn’t want to lug around a proper camera, so for the “Photo by Erin Blake” credit on these images, please read “No-flash photo by Erin Blake, taken in haste with her phone, and very definitely not a Folger photo by Julie Ainsworth“).… Continue Reading

Research aids: understanding catalog records

A number of posts and comments in The Collation have discussed the wonderful work that Folger catalogers do. But sometimes we all need assistance to fully grasp what information is being conveyed in those detailed Hamnet records. As I mentioned in a footnote in my last post, I find the RBMS/BSC Latin Place Names File a very useful resource in working with early book imprints, since the Latin form of place names given in imprints is sometimes so very different from the names by which I know of those places.… Continue Reading

Marginalizing heralds and antiquaries

Title page of Augustine Vincent's A discouerie of errours The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were a period of major transition for English heralds, as the number of arms being granted increased exponentially, requiring improved methods of record-keeping. Their job was both ceremonial (ordering and keeping score at tournaments, ordering funerals) and archival (granting and confirming coats of arms, carrying out visitation to determine the accuracy of the pedigrees and coats of arms that people claimed, and compiling dictionaries of arms to prevent duplication).… Continue Reading

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